• I think the reason clojure is so bad at displaying helpful stacktraces is that rhickey doesn't make mistakes. (via @arohner)
  • Results from the State of Clojure, Summary 2010 Survey (here, via @cemerick) -- So the results are in and the data is interesting. Lots of web development, for one. Lots of math apps too... There seems to be some issues with the tool chain; Emacs vs. IDE and maven vs. leiningen, for example, but nothing that we didn't know already. Also, Clojure is bringing a lot of new developers to Functional Programming, mainly from Java, and most of them would not go back to Java if Clojure disappeared; they'd rather go with Scala, Common Lisp, Haskell or Scheme. The whole summary of the poll is a very interesting read and a testament to the diversity in the Clojure community.
    • My thoughts on Clojure and Emacs (here, via @briancarper) -- So one of the outcomes of said survey is that 70% of Clojure devs are using Emacs. What these results do not tell us is whether that high usage is because Clojure developers love Emacs or because Emacs is the development environment currently better adapted to Clojure. "Emacs is not for everyone", as the title of this post says. The author exposes why he thinks a better solution needs to be built.
    • Petition / Market Research: For the development of a commercially-supported, polished Clojure development environment (here, via @cemerick) -- ... and speaking of which, Chas Emerick has put together an online petition asking for a polished IDE for Clojure (that is not Emacs). ┬áPlease go ahead and fill it out to see where everyone stands.
  • Some suggested Clojure agent thread pool issues and improvements (here, via @puredanger) -- Alex Miller knows one thing or two about working with threads and now he proposes a few improvements to the way Clojure deals with threads to make the developer's life simpler. For example, naming the threads so you can identify them in a thread dump. Lots of wisdom in his proposals.
  • Just pushed some ant and #clojure samples to #cloudhackers #cloud demo site (here, via @jclouds) -- jclouds lets you manage your cloud in a high-level and portable manner, mainly from Java. But recently they have added Clojure support, so now you can do great stuff on the cloud from the REPL. This post is about some new examples of operations on the Cloud with Clojure.